Topic:

Analytics and Visualization

Latest Headlines

Latest Headlines

Big data 'revolution' needs to happen, now

Yes, there is a big data revolution afoot and this time around things are getting real! 

3 ways data visualizations can lie

You've heard me sound this warning before: big data can and does lie. Most often the lies told are not intentional but rather a result of bungling the project.

Beijing government looking to build big data platform

Rest assured that all governments are or will be using big data. The latest to stake claim to its benefits is Beijing.

Transforming elections in India using big data

U.S. politics is not the only place you'll find big data at work. It's increasingly used in countries around the world with mixed results. Indeed, it is at the core of elections now underway in India.

Big data is not about petabytes, but complex computing

You've heard me and several others repeatedly say that the term big data is unfortunate because it's really not about the size of the data, but about the complexity of the computing. In other words, big data tools are not contained to usage where there are petabytes of data. Those tools are useful with just about any sized data if you're doing complex computing with it.

9 reasons why getting big data right is so danged hard

Big data naysayers and expert evaluators do add value to the process by pointing out where real problems exist. That actually helps the rest of us correct our sights. Here are nine of those problems in one neat little list by two very good expert evaluators…

Roll of the big data dice: will car makers risk litigation or go for preventative certainty?

Automotive manufacturers currently have to assume costly manufacturing errors in their balance sheet: namely a rainy day piggy bank for the inevitable recalls and litigation costs. Predictive diagnostics can quickly change that scenario by finding problems in vehicles before they start killing people and ringing up the jury awards. The question is, will big data inform automakers that taking the litigation risk may actually be cheaper than fixing the problems? And if so, which path will automakers choose to take?

Microsoft Excel now on big data steroids

Face it, business users love their spreadsheet. They do! Now they can do big data on Excel too! Bottom line: Microsoft just hit the sweet spot in corporate data democratization and BI adoption at the user level.

Next evolutionary step for BI: process intelligence

BI is a lot like that old adage about three scientists taking turns peering through a peephole in a fence and seeing three different parts of an elephant? One sees a bit of trunk, another sees a wrinkled huge mass, and the third catches a quick glimpse of a swinging rope-like tail. They interpret and argue their visions separately and come up with interpretations that do not reveal to them that they are seeing parts of the same thing. Evolving process intelligence is working to solve that problem. 

First came face recognition, now there's food recognition--for calorie counting

I see your face and know your name (and a bunch of other stuff about you) using a  face recognition and big data cocktail. But let's face it, what we really want to do is count calories without actually counting them or typing a bunch of questionable numbers in an app. Now we can with DataAet ORANGE. Ok. So it's a prototype but it's still cool. Here's how it works…